jondrums

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 38 total)
  • Replies
    jondrums
    Participant

    I spent a bunch more time practicing since I last posted. I went from barely being about to get going on my GL210 to nailing it every time now. Now that I have the hang of it, the 210 is not much more energy intensive to pump – it requires more speed in the first place and is a lot less forgiving of timing and touchdowns. I can rest for just a moment and glide on the 240 if I’m high enough and have enough speed – can’t do that on the 210 (yet?).

    Two new learnings I discovered that really help me:
    * when trying to recover from being too low and slow, actively scoot the board forward with your feet during the unweight portion of the pump. That seems to get the foil a little extra speed which helps it to rise up higher each pump.
    * don’t let the board get ahead of you before you jump off the dock. not sure why, but if I have to jump forward to get on the board I’m failing every time. When I keep the board right alongside me as I’m running it seems to work much better.

    jondrums
    Participant

    I’ve been looking a combo dock-start and wake-foil board. Here’s what I’ve turned up, but both are quite expensive. Also, I’m not quite sure how it will be like trying to get out of the water behind a boat on such a small board. They’re super light for pumping though. If I found one used for half price or so, I might pull the trigger

    https://www.kanahashapes.com/boards

    jondrums
    Participant

    Brought out the camera this morning and had a fun session with the GL240 and GL210. The 210 took a little practice to get it going off the dock, but then it doesn’t really seem like it needs more effort, just less forgiving.

    jondrums
    Participant

    oh my god, it just keeps getting better. I had an absolutely fantastic 1 hour session this morning in completely flat water. So fun. I think I’m going to lose 10 pounds if I keep this up. Highly recommend adding a local dock spot to your list for when the swell is flat.

    jondrums
    Participant

    coming from SUP, I’ve put the SurfoCo handle on the back end of all my boards. It’s fantastic for keeping control of the board in the impact zone. I put a handle on my sup foilboard and use it all the time, but it takes way less pull in my experience. I think the foil is creating lift and keeping the board at the surface and therefore reducing the “drag” it has – so its much easier to hang onto. I haven’t tried holding the nose, that’s also a very interesting idea. I’m guessing the ideas above to use a piece of deckpad might be perfect.

    This must be what I keep seeing on the nose of some kalama sup foil boards – was wondering about that…

    jondrums
    Participant

    I’ve never made a board (did lots of repair work though). For the chinook boxes are you guys glassing completely over the fin boxes and then when the board is all done you go back and use a bearing guided router to cut slots in the glass? Or are people cutting slots in the cloth before glassing so the slot is clear? Sorry for the stupid question

    jondrums
    Participant

    Where are people finding the Naish S25 6m for sale right now?

    jondrums
    Participant

    — one thing i see people getting consistently wrong is the belief that efficiency equals speed —

    I don’t agree with you at all on this one. Your analogies of a fighter jet are about powered flight. We are unpowered (surf foiling at least) and relying on harnessing the energy of a wave. For a fighter jet, speed = biggest engine. For us, speed = efficiency because that’s the way to convert the same amount of wave energy into the most speed output.

    Said another way, energy input is from the wave, drag is from the wing/fuse/mast. The speed at which those two are equal is the maximum speed attainable. Less drag is going to translate to higher speed.

    And since we need are using the wing for lift, we have to consider the lift/drag ratio at each speed we care about. Lift needs to be more or less equal to the weight of the rider and the board and drag is what it is. Higher aspect foils have a higher lift-drag ratio for a given wetted surface area and if they are sized right, they’ll be faster on a wave. Where we get in trouble is riding too big a foil – it’ll top out in speed too early.

    jondrums
    Participant

    Our county health officer requested (but didn’t mandate by law) that people don’t drive to recreate. They stated that all types of recreation that respect physical distancing are allowed and even encouraged to keep good mental health. But he asked that this should be within the neighborhood in which you live, accessed by walking or biking. Everything you touch while recreating is a possible vector, bathroom door handle, parking meter, handrail, even the gas-pump handle. So if you drive 15 miles to the beach, that means you’re spreading whatever you have across a bigger radius.

    I’m respecting the request even though it is super painful not to surf. At least I can mountain bike out my back door… My bike hasn’t seen so much action in years.

    I feel like biking has to go on the list of activities that keep you in good shape for foiling with the exception of paddling.

    jondrums
    Participant

    This isn’t just in 2020, but I’m seeing more and more boards with the hollowed out “cheek” recesses on the tail. So what’s that supposed to do? I assume its working since everyone’s liking it.

    jondrums
    Participant

    I found tactile footpads to help immensely. That helped me get and keep my feet centerline and well placed fore/aft. Now I move around a bit on the deck, but I always have a reference of where I am without looking. I did a full writeup on installing them in a semi-permanent way on my SUP, and I did the same on my prone board. Its even more of a big deal to get my feet right on prone. My back foot goes pretty much right over the mast and front foot 25″ forward (center of foot to center of foot).
    https://www.standupzone.com/forum/index.php/topic,34106.msg387396.html#msg387396

    jondrums
    Participant

    what’s the idea behind a forward sweep?

    jondrums
    Participant

    Here’s a bunch of foil wing data – its got numbers for the 180 and 210
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17xbTGEWSVeRhnYb_4vz_Gmby8UnrDys7Q1iB-6rC6F4/edit#gid=0

    jondrums
    Participant

    Posting an update a few sessions later. The board is still dog slow and tiring to paddle back out, but I’m catching waves and getting on the foil regularly now. Haven’t got a 2 for 1 yet, but that’s more because conditions haven’t been great for it. I’m able to pump back out to where I started about a third of the time, which is pretty nice given how painful it is to paddle. I’m glad everything is shut down anyway to force me through a bit more learning curve with this board before I give up and order a custom 45-50L sled.

    jondrums
    Participant

    juandesooka2 your advise is spot on. My paddle fitness is getting there, but not good enough yet. The board is completely underwater while paddling, but I do think this has a bit to do with the shape. If I get further back on the board, I can have the nose just barely out of the water, but its even slower paddling like that.

    There is a possibility that it isn’t actually 40L even though it is marked that way.

    I should add that I had a great session this morning with a dozen long waves foiled. So fun. Essentially, it was the combination of getting better little by little along with driving a bit further to a wave more suited for whitewater takeoffs. With a session like that, at least I can see the future now and will keep at it.

Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 38 total)