prone frustration: input about the difference a board makes

Forums Beginner prone frustration: input about the difference a board makes

  • Post
    jondrums
    Participant

    I’ve been SUP foiling for 2.5 years and recently my SUP board has taken on some water and needs repair. So I borrowed my buddies prone foil board that he never got working for him and have been committed to learning prone foiling. I won’t say the shaper, but its a 5′ 40L board and I’m 205# + wetsuit. Tuttle box, flat bottom, majorly chined rails and thick, decent amount of rocker up front. I’m 20 sessions in and having a ton of trouble getting into waves and getting my feet settled. Once I do, the foiling and pumping is dreamy, but that’s been few and far between. Still getting completely skunked some sessions depending on the quality of the wave coming through on any given day.

    This is the only prone board I’ve tried. But I know that a lot with the SUP boards I’ve ridden there is a massive difference in how they catch waves.

    Who here has ridden a bunch of prone boards and can give me some reassurance whether the same thing follows on prone boards – or is it just me sucking? One of the reasons foiling is so fun for me is that I can grab waves in takeoff spots that nobody else is, but this is just not happening for me with prone.

    1) seems like the tuttle box is too far forward and weight placement for catching the wave isn’t right?
    2) the thing paddles like a dog even though 40L seems like it should be fine, maybe too much rocker in the nose?
    3) anyone have a prone board that catches waves with or even before the longboard crew?

Viewing 10 replies - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Replies
    TooMuchEpoxy
    Participant

    Avid pron rider.

    1) if the tuttle is too far forward you will feel it “Bucking” as you start to get speed dropping in. One thing to help is right as you start to get speed, grab the rails and ooch your body forward to get in the right position.

    whats happening is your COG needed for paddling (weight back so the nose doesn’t dig) is behind your foiling COG (weight forward so it doesn’t overfoil) The bigger you are the farther back the foil needs to go, this is because a lighter rider can cheat more weight forward when paddling without the nose digging in.

    If this is whats happening and you can adjust your rear wing, angle the wing up, less downforce = less main wing lift = Moving the center of lift back.

    2)They all paddle like dogs, this, combined with the extreme distances you ride and paddle, has lead to me loosing 20lbs since starting foiling.

    3)I don’t catch outside with the logs, you still have to catch a wave on a 5’0 or whatever which isn’t happenin. I catch deep and can ride through the sections to poach waves from the inside. Also, in some conditions i’ll catch a quick shorebreak section, just to get on foil to pump out to a meaty section out with the logs.

    Prone surfing is more like prone foiling. If your not a regular prone surfer its gonna be tough. That pop up is critical.

    Hdip
    Participant

    Can you shim a tuttle box? What foil setup is itat least? I’m guessing a gofoil if it’s tuttle box.

    I’ve only ridden two boards. My 4’8″ WCFC 31 liter board. Then I’ve ridden an old Takuma 4’6″. The takuma was 34ish liters. Takuma caught waves slightly better, but for some reason felt slower in the air. I don’t really know what that’s about. I don’t have the Takuma anymore. EDIT: Oh yeah, I’m 6’1″ and 185#.

    I pulled some clips of me taking off next to longboarders for you. It’s doable. You have to paddle hard though. No way around that. The SUP with a paddle and a big wing will definitely give you a much wider takeoff area. With the prone board you need a wave with at least a little bit of push. The difference might be a ten foot takeoff zone on a SUP compared to a 3 foot takeoff zone prone? I’ve never ridden a SUP foil. Just guessing and going off what I’ve seen in real life.

    jondrums
    Participant

    I quit prone surfing when I started SUP 10 years ago, but my arms are getting back in shape now. Glad to hear its me and not the equipment. Too easy to blame the equipment and then waste a bunch of money. I’m on the GoFoil GL210 or 140 depending on the size of the wave.

    I feel like there must be a middle ground. The SUP is too heavy and long and the prone board might as well not be there. You guys who started with prone are spoiled – Learning to pump a SUP makes the prone board effortless. I’m thinking of a bit longer but still plenty lightweight prone board that paddles into waves earlier.

    surfcowboy
    Participant

    Jondrums, this post makes me happy I haven’t cut that prone blank I’m holding down yet lol. I’m going to keep every bit of length hearing you guys talk, at least til I feel solid.

    Man, grateful for the internet.

    waterwings
    Participant

    Going from a sup to a small prone is a big jump and you should expect it to take some practice. It did for me anyway. I find on the prone I’m much pickier with waves. It either has to be really slopey or whitewater takeoff. A lot of times I’ll sit inside close to where the wave ends, catch it behind someone then cruise out to the shoulder when they kick out. It’s all about catching the right size and shape wave to give you the most opportunity. That’s one reason the guys in Maui are so good, there’s a bunch of soft mushy waves there where you can get long rides. Love that place!

    juandesooka2
    Participant

    At 40L your board sounds big enough, though too much rocker isn’t ideal. If it is underwater when paddling, or when you sit on it, if you are nipple deep, then you need more volume.

    For take-off, I’d recommend you only try white water take-offs until you feel comfortable. You can quickly and easily catch up to the face once up. For me, this has been a bonus of prone foiling, it doesn’t matter how big or how messy it is, I can catch waves — and that’s been the tradeoff vs the faster paddling capability for sup foiling, ends up the same waves caught (or more actually, my MO being taking off behind the SUPers, then when they fall, taking over the wave from there… 😉

    My first thought was you didn’t say if you’re a shortboard surfer, then later on said you’ve been SUPing 10 years. That may be the most important factor here…the challenges you are experiencing sound like they are more due to paddle fitness and your pop-up. Sorry to say it … and I only do so because I am exactly the same, 10 years longboard/sup/kite, being honest I couldn’t compete on a shortboard in the crowds and current any more. I now have 3 months solid on prone board and I’m in the best paddling shape since my 30s, lost 10 pounds, etc. So… stick with it, every session will get better. And if you’re really wanting to crack the nut, consider some exercise outside the water … in particular burpees. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TU8QYVW0gDU

    jondrums
    Participant

    juandesooka2 your advise is spot on. My paddle fitness is getting there, but not good enough yet. The board is completely underwater while paddling, but I do think this has a bit to do with the shape. If I get further back on the board, I can have the nose just barely out of the water, but its even slower paddling like that.

    There is a possibility that it isn’t actually 40L even though it is marked that way.

    I should add that I had a great session this morning with a dozen long waves foiled. So fun. Essentially, it was the combination of getting better little by little along with driving a bit further to a wave more suited for whitewater takeoffs. With a session like that, at least I can see the future now and will keep at it.

    juandesooka2
    Participant

    If the board is under water while you’re paddling, then it sounds like it’s under-volumed for you. I have 2 home-made prone boards, the first is a barge that paddles super easy. The second I figured I was hot stuff and made it quite a bit smaller. I can catch waves on it and it’s fun once up, but after about an hour I am spent … just way too much work to paddle. And if conditions are marginal, it’s hard to make it work. I’ve gone back to my big floatie.

    You should maybe try to find a bigger board, even if just for early stage while you’re getting your feet under you. Or at least to demo, so you can identify if that’s the issue.

    But hey, dozen long waves, that sounds good! Maybe you’ve got it dialed. 🙂

    jondrums
    Participant

    Posting an update a few sessions later. The board is still dog slow and tiring to paddle back out, but I’m catching waves and getting on the foil regularly now. Haven’t got a 2 for 1 yet, but that’s more because conditions haven’t been great for it. I’m able to pump back out to where I started about a third of the time, which is pretty nice given how painful it is to paddle. I’m glad everything is shut down anyway to force me through a bit more learning curve with this board before I give up and order a custom 45-50L sled.

    surfcowboy
    Participant

    Yeah man, that’s one upside of this. Buying less gear. 🙂

    Keep at it. Surfing is pretty great social distancing.

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