Big surf wings V’s High aspect wings

Forums Prone Foiling Big surf wings V’s High aspect wings

  • Post
    Foil Feed
    Keymaster

    I’m curious what everyone is ridding now for those smaller days and when wanting to connect multiple waves.

    Are people choosing to buy or ride ride large surf over high aspect wings for prone foiling?

    What are you riding and why?

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
  • Replies
    foilfridays
    Participant

    I can’t wait for this discussion. I should mention that I am 200 lbs. Ride mostly knee to head high, short period, weak swell.

    Always been a fan of the Lift foils. 200 glide w/ 40 stab is magic, 170 fish for better waves.

    Lately I’ve been in love with the MFC1400 with 225 stab and black shim. An insane blend of speed range, maneuverability, pump-ability, and predictability. It has some magic sauce that makes it super efficient and easy to pump. Can’t even explain it. It is my go-to for lightwind kite, prone knee high to head high, and wing ding in decent winds. Sometimes ride the 1250 and 1075, 225 or 200 stab, black or white shim for overhead or kiting in average winds/waves. You can cover so much range with these wings and they are so easy to ride. Even at high speeds, the lift is very neutral and ready to rip a turn.

    I’ve also started to play with Unifoil Vortex 175. Seems a lot like the MFC1250, I like the stabilizer choices. Still figuring it out.

    Also loving a lot of the high aspect stuff. Gofoil GL180, GL140, Naish 1400ha, 1800ha, Unifoil Hyper 210. These are a bit more temperamental than the ones mentioned above and require a bit more thought when riding. The pitchiness is more mellow and they seem to accelerate at a mellower pace but also glide longer. I find you can “pump them on foil” on a weak wave, once you get them going you are good to go. I’ve felt they behave best when you treat them like a hyperlight glider. By that, I guess I mean that you want to keep speed and turn with larger arcs. They stall a bit easier, but you can keep speed really well without much energy into a pump. A very short/shallow fast interval pump works well for me. The action is more like jumping on a small kids trampoline than big pumping motions. Most of these are quite loose in the yaw and can be turned in a skatey “tic-tac” kind of way at lower speeds but require more commitment for roll “bank” type turns. Work excellent when you get used to them and learn/respect their characteristics. We are not in the wingding category but the high aspect also works excellent for that because of their speed range.

    I should probably also mention Moses. They make excellent foils and most of the prone riders ignore them for some reason. 790/450 is a great small wave foil, 683/450 for larger surf.

    Clamsmasha
    Participant

    I was using the Iwa for everything and it was the right wing for me most of the time…good for surfing, good for pumping and relatively fast. In small stuff that drops into deeper water, I found it a bit draggy and I had to pump it along instead of naturally accelerating along the wave.

    No I use the GL210 for everything. It’s fast, pumps 4 times better, and after some relearning it turns really well. This is in conjunction with a shortened fuse. Most waves are triples now, it’s just that easy on this setup.

    I’m making a 140 size wing right now just to step up my surf game, but I could live with the 210 or 180 on a desert island for sure.

    richie-rich
    Participant

    Interesting topic for sure. Clamsmasha and surf together, he’s better, but I’ll add my 2c.

    I’ve gone all in on the high aspect, GL180 and I’ve just added a GL140 for surf.

    Perth is an odd place to foil. We don’t have particularly good waves, or waves at all. Down south at Margaret River totally different. The 2 main areas we surf at a little wave to get into then one rolls to dry beach / reef and the other into deeper water but it keeps a bit of a wall. The more surf oriented wings like the Moses I tried were great on the wave and face of the wave but the pump runs were hard work in comparison. The GL180 and 140 allow so much glide that the flat water pump runs to link waves becomes easy and almost enjoyable.

    I also wanted to minimise the $$ spent and have multiple options out of minimal wings. I wingding and aspire to DW paddle and prone, so my combo of wings is absolutely perfect for that.

    I feel the 140 will be more than surfy enough for me when I head down south to decent waves with a face or if I go wingding surfing.

    So far I haven’t noticed any major downsides with my quiver. I think with 2 front and a few different tail setups I have the near perfect setup for all aspects I want to use it for and surf from 1/2 foot through to 6’. After that well who knows!

    FoilFrother
    Participant

    I prefer high aspect, rather than the big high lift, slow speed wings for small days.
    I just can’t make the big wings work, I’m either getting bucked off them as they breach, or going straight because I can hardly turn them.

    MightyMike
    Participant

    At a weight (175lbs.) near the top end of Large wings and low end of XL wings, I’ve had a bit of trouble finding the sweet spot between performance and glide. Nearly every day is 3 foot or under at my local so a lot of foiling going on here.

    First, full disclosure: I am awful at getting out of a wave at top speed. It’s just inherent in my surf instincts to ride a wave till it closes out or peters out. I’m also a horrible dancer, which I think helps with the rhythm required for being a good pump foiler.

    Started on Naish Thrust wings, rode the L wing but never had the pump power to get it going for long stretches. Got an XL wing and I could really pump the wing out the back for doubles and triples but it was a beast to surf in anything over waist high.

    Moved on to the Naish Jet wing and really liked how the 1250 surfed but still had trouble pumping out the back. Somehow, lucked into a good deal on an MFC 1250 setup and really liked the speed and control of the wing. With the success I had going to the XL wing, I got the 1400 wing and sold my Naish gear.

    Surprisingly, I can’t pump the 1400 nearly as well as the 1250. The 1400 is for sale in the classifieds if anyone is interested.

    With the High Aspect craze in full affect, I got myself on Signature stuff, Stealth 175 and Albatross 175. Love the Stealth 175, I can pump it for doubles and it surfs fast and turns quick. It doesn’t have the built in lift of the other surf wings I’ve ridden, but it almost never breaches.

    The Albatross 175 is the first HA wing I’ve ridden and it’s a trip. First, I have to ride it all the way forward in the box when the waves are small (waist high or under). Up and riding it surfs fast, turns are a bit wider but almost limitless speed on the wave. Pumping is quite a bit different and I definitely feel a lot more currents and turbulence on the HA. Had a bit of trouble keeping the wing balanced pumping back out (remember, horrible dancer) and recently modified a larger stabilizer (Naish jet 320) to fit the Alabtross with a lot of success.

    As a gear hound, I’m frothing to go to a larger HA wing. Most likely the Alabtross 210 or maybe give the new Naish HA equipment another shot.

    Dougy
    Participant

    I used to ride a 1600cm front wing and I could pump it around okay but I didn’t love it in the surf. I’ve recently gone to the Signature Albatross 210 and wow that’s so easy to pump around. It’s a lightly different pumping technique but when you hit the correct tempo and get the correct technique, if really is almost effortless.

    In terms of riding them in the surf, I much prefer the feeling of the high aspect wing then the bigger surf wings. The HA carve really nice and it doesn’t seem to mind if you breach a wing tip in a turn, you can hear it but you just keep riding. The big surf wings I find slow and harder to turn.

    +1 for high aspects! 👍

    topmick
    Participant

    I’ve just moved from a high aspect (Axis 900) to Armstrong HS1550/232. I don’t think I’ve lost any glide or pump-ability but definitely gained in maneuverability, our local conditions are usually 1-2′ weak/rivermouth slop.

    Kane DW
    Moderator

    I usually ride my smal wing all the time but would definitely go mid/high aspect for the really tiny days. Trick in turning the high aspect wings is turning hard enough to make the wings flex and give you dihedral. I’ve noticed my more flexible 210 surfs way better than the stiff one for that reason

    foilgraham
    Participant

    There’s an awesome article regarding High Aspect Wings in the new edition of Foiling Magazine.

    The author, ‘Dr George’ of Delta Foils goes into detail regarding ‘The Good, The Bad, The Ugly, and Conclusions’ regarding the HA wings. Pretty enlightening read!

    juandesooka2
    Participant

    “First, full disclosure: I am awful at getting out of a wave at top speed. It’s just inherent in my surf instincts to ride a wave till it closes out or peters out. I’m also a horrible dancer, which I think helps with the rhythm required for being a good pump foiler.”

    Haha! Agree about the kicking out … I need to figure out this pumping, but have a hard time giving up a hard-earned wave. And maybe point taken about the dancing, I haven’t had any complaints…but now that I think of it, no compliments either. 😉

    Appreciate all the input on the options. I am still too green to have much to offer. I rode Slingshot 84,h2,76, now have GF kai, iwa, maliko200. The maliko is very smooth, with a little pump added can say on foil in the tiniest ripple. With so many positive reviews of the GL series, I am DIY’ing some imitations. I messed up the GL180, but the 140 is looking good, hoping to have it out in a week or so. It won’t be as good as the real thing, but hopefully hits enough of the positives to make it worthy.

    Sidenote: interesting to see how the gear evolves and also ricochets back and forth. I started in kite foiling, when the racers were revolutionizing it, and if your foil wasn’t tiny and fast it was considered a POS. Then came along the kiters like me who wanted to slow down and feel the wave, didn’t care about speed, wanted to carve….lower aspect “fun” surf wings took over, so much so that people realized you could actually surf them without a kite or tow. And now that surf foiling is a thing, riders are going back to the high aspect speedy wings the kite racers use. Full circle! What’s next, neon sunglasses and synth pop…oops, that too…I am getting old.

    Foil Feed
    Keymaster

    It’s interesting to see foil surfing learning from kite foiling. There is still a lot more development to come in the surf foil market and what some of the brands have out at the moment is incredible.

    Regarding exiting with speed. Don’t leave the wave early but when you decide your about to pull off your wave if your not going fast, try and remain on the wave and start your pumping with the wave to increase your speed before pulling off.

    TooMuchEpoxy
    Participant

    Anyone have dimensions on any of the wings in the gofoil GL series(wingspan, leading edge to trailing edge)? I know the dimensions of the naish HA wings (MASSIVE) and just wanted to know the size of the GL wings as a point of comparison.

    jondrums
    Participant

    Here’s a bunch of foil wing data – its got numbers for the 180 and 210
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17xbTGEWSVeRhnYb_4vz_Gmby8UnrDys7Q1iB-6rC6F4/edit#gid=0

    TooMuchEpoxy
    Participant

    Thanks for this! Big Help! Got any idea of max thickness on the naish HA 1400?

    Foil Feed
    Keymaster

    I’m not sure on the stats of the 1400HA but it’s definitely one of the better Naish wings out there. I haven’t ridden it but I’ve seen some guys out ridding it and they all seem to like it, I’ve only heard good things.

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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