Beginner pump skills

Forums Beginner Beginner pump skills

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    supluv
    Participant

    What is the best way to learn how to pump the foil and practice pumping the foil for skills and fitness?

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
  • Replies
    foilgraham
    Participant

    If you are catching waves successfully, I would recommend kicking out of waves early when you have plenty of speed.

    As you glide off the back of the wave, feel the glide. As the board starts to loose altitude, suck your knees up to your chest and then slowly straighten them back out. Then repeat, and repeat, and repeat.

    Play with the amount of force you pull up your feet and the cadence in which you do so.

    If you do this for a few sessions, it should start to work itself out.

    The proper equipment is key. The main hindrances would be poor foot placement, longer boards (more swing weight), slow foil, slow starting speed, lack of core and legs muscles, lack of cardio.

    If you have a prone board, you could also find a good dock and learn how to dock start. Back foot first.

    Kane DW
    Moderator

    ^^^^^
    Perfect explanation!

    How to train? Stairs are good but getting out there is better!

    ericfoil
    Moderator

    Get a small prone board and start working on dock starts again. Back foot first–just Ahead of the mast. Floating dock. Practice makes perfect. You will get it.

    FLFOILER
    Participant

    Behind a boat helps also. Each foil has it’s own pump pattern and glide distance so you can really tune your timing with a boat wake since it’s constant and you can hold the rope till you’re comfortable to let it go. Once you let the rope go, it’ll be easier than when you were holding the rope. Great fun to pump away from the wake and then catch back up to it or grab the wake further back and use that to pump back to the first wake.

    Zane Saenz
    Participant

    Foot placement is also a little different when I pump personally. I found that when I’m pumping out it seems easier to keep the forward momentum if you put your back foot a little farther forward than when your foiling on a wave. It is harder to keep the forward momentum when your back foot is too far back and your weight is going back.

    Foil Feed
    Keymaster

    I second what Zane said.

    For me my back foot comes forward about 2” for flat water pumping and pumping back out.

    For me though, I don’t move my back foot forward until I have some forward speed. If I’m doing a beach start or coming off the back of a wave, I have my feet where I normally foil, and once I have some speed the back foot moves forward.

    waterwings
    Participant

    I’ve just recently begun connecting waves on my gl 180 and I think the biggest mistake I was making, and I didn’t realize it until I saw myself on video, was too much front foot while pumping. Back foot is where speed and power come from. Pitch the nose down and that’s exactly where you’ll go. I was going up and down and not getting anywhere. I feel this is exaggerated on a high aspect wing that is inherently pitch sensitive due to its thin chord length.

    ericfoil
    Moderator

    Try to be conscious of your back foot while pumping. That heel should be coming up off the board then touching down again, intermittently.

    ScotY
    Participant

    When you’re weighting and unweighting, which foot does more work in each instance? Ivy e been trying to figure it out and have been sort of pumping like how you ollie on a skateboard. It’s not working for me. 😂

    jackfromtown
    Participant

    Remember to breath in and out while pumping and swing those arms!

    ChasingBumps
    Participant

    For an “alternative” view – I suggest don’t get too obsessed with pumping. It’s seems a lot of people think that’s the whole point of foiling and you see them pumping away from good waves and sections, pumping when they don’t need to and just plain trying too hard. It’s ugly.
    Maybe concentrate on surfing (if you live in good waves) and learning good carving first. Worry about 2 waves later.
    It reminds me of guys who surf and do too much of the “Huntington hop”.
    Tom Curren I think once said he preferred to carve side to side than hop.
    The same applies to foiling. You’d be surprised how much more speed a turn can generate than a pump.
    Now of course pumping is a core and very functional part of foiling but I’m just putting it out there to not let the pendulum swing too far (pun intended) to thinking that is all that makes a good Foiler. You can tell the guys obsessed over it as soon as they stand up on a wave – they immediately start trying to stomp a fire out where there’s plenty of wave power.
    Watch the guys who are always on rail and the amount of speed they maintain vs the straight line humpers and you won’t care if they paddle back out.
    But hey – nothing beats a pump-out-to-oncoming-wave-hard-rail-carve!
    Maybe just make sure you have the rail part down first. 🙂

    sky.rama
    Participant

    Chasing bumps is correct, learn to ride waves and become one with your hover craft 1st, once it becomes a part of you, you and your hydro have a good chance of pumping off into the sunset. Until then mastering your flight control is the utmost importance.

    Clamsmasha
    Participant

    foilgraham nailed it.

    As for concentrating on surfing before pumping…..it depends what quality of waves you’re riding. Nice if you live next to a 1000m point break, but I started in windswell mostly and had a small window of opportunity to get up, fly and get off before rocks, weed or beach so I had to pump ASAP. Even in good surf though, every wave comes to an end. If you’ve got the speed and nowhere else to go, why not start working on that technique and fitness?

    Pumping is amazing, though not so much while you’re pushing a huge fat wing along a wave. Its one major improvement on surfing. A chairlift, JetSki and intense workout all in one. You can accelerate and move at speed on the right gear if your legs and heart are up to it. It shrinks the lineup and gets you to sections you couldn’t possibly paddle into, it allows you to square up to oncoming sections and rail the living daylights out of them.

    “ But hey – nothing beats a pump-out-to-oncoming-wave-hard-rail-carve!”

    Hot truth right there.

    ScotY
    Participant

    Okay,so I get the part about not pumping just for the sake of doing it. But, as Clamsmasha says, sometimes it’s a valuable skill to have. And something I still can’t figure out. I’ve been kind of doing it like an ollie and it seems to help to make it through a weak section. But any attempts at pumping back out usually end quickly…each pump I seem to be making less forward progress and getting lower and lower to the water. How to improve?

    sky.rama
    Participant

    After each wave as stated keeping your momentum is key, If you pull out of a wave with little speed your doomed before you even start, also having the wing up near the surface is less resistance when pumping, it sounds like to me your base plate position could use some micro adjustment to find the optimal sweet spot that we all miss and dont even realize how important that is! The foil becomes so alive and feels so right when you find your spot. Thats a whole other topic. I have done every frequency of pumping, fast and light, slow and heavy swoops etc. They all work and all suck the life force from you fast, so Efficientcy is a major key in being a pump prince or a one pump chump. Most important my friend is practice and determination. It took me awhile to figure out and comes when your ready. Enjoy the glide.

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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